Thursday, October 29, 2009

Ethiopia Adoption Q&A

I first wrote this in the beginning of the adoption journey - and updated it three years in. My updates are in pink. 

So many of our family and friends have been asking questions about Ethiopia. I got another one today and thought, hey....I do have this thing called a blog...

Pretend we are at Starbucks...sipping some strong Ethiopian java.

Q: Why do you want to adopt?
A: The short answer: We want more children. There are children who want parents. Voila.

The long answer: God placed a love of adoption on both of our hearts before we ever met. Walker's favorite verse has always been Galatians 4:6-7 - it was one of the verses we chose to print in our wedding bulletin. Both of us feel that next to marriage, adoption is the closest earthly reproduction of God's love for us. We are blessed and honored and humbled to mimic our Father in this manner: to choose a child who is not of us, to call him or her our own, and make him or her our beloved heir - in the same way that the Lord did for us via the blood of our Savior Jesus Christ.

There are 147 million orphans in the world. That number makes me weep. I would mother all of them if I could. I can't. But I can mother at least one.

Q: What? Ethiopia? I thought you wanted a baby from China?
A: We did. I have dreamed of getting a little girl from China for years and years. Unfortunately, due to a variety of reasons, it is getting harder and harder to adopt from China and the wait is very long, as in 4-6 years minimum long. And personally, I just don't trust China not to shut down their program all of a sudden, leaving hundreds of parents and orphans stranded. We went with Ethiopia because we thought it would be quick and 'easy.' Can you say IRONY?

Q: So why Ethiopia?
A: The short answer: we don't have much choice. Most countries will not adopt out their orphans to homes with more than three previous kids. (Because an orphanage with hundreds of kids is better than a loving home with four kids? Don't get me started!!) Still true and still crazy.
Also, we can get a baby from Ethiopia, and I want as tiny a baby as possible that feeling passed. Ethiopia is also one of the cheaper countries from which to adopt, the timing is quicker (15-18 months, usually) HAHAHAHAHA, we only travel to Ethiopia one time and only stay about a week, they changed this to two trips and the process is pretty straightforward oh Lord I was naive. Not that we had much of a choice, because did I mention most countries think an orphanage with hundreds of children is better than a loving home with four children??

The long answer:
  • One in eight children die before their fifth birthday. (What? You need more reasons?)
  • There are FIVE MILLION orphans in Ethiopia
  • That is the same number of children under age 18 who reside in Massachusetts, New York State, and Washington DC combined. If every parent in those places died tonight - that would be similar to Ethiopia's orphan crisis.
  • More than half a million of these were orphaned as a result of AIDS.
  • Over 150,000 children live on the streets
  • life expectancy in Ethiopia 39 years for males and 42 years for females. The leading cause of death is communicable diseases such as malaria, typhoid, meningitis, cholera, AIDS, tuberculosis, yellow fever.
  • Woman have an average of 7 children and the maternal mortality rate is 1 in 14
  • Ethiopia's neonatal mortality rate is one of the highest in the world - 49/1000 births with tetanus infection being the second major cause of infant/neonatal death.
  • Ethiopia is one of the poorest countries in the world. Over half the population lives on less than a $1 a day. The average income in Ethiopia is US$100 a year. Almost 82% of the population lives on less than $1 a day.
  • Malnutrition levels are among the highest in the world.
  • Ethiopia is experiencing yet another drought now.
  • Only 42.7% age 15 and over can read and write. The literacy rate for women is 35%.
  • Only 18 percent of children reach grade five. That means 82% of children don't.
Added bonus: Ethiopia produces the cutest babies of pretty much anywhere on the planet. This still stands.

The other country we seriously considered was Rwanda, which has just begun adopting. And has since closed. I'm very glad we didn't go with Rwanda - many families had to stop mid-stream. Rwanda still has not re-opened adoptions and doesn't seem to be any time soon.

Q: There are plenty of kids who need homes here in America. Why aren't you adopting one of them?
A: There are plenty of kids who need homes here in America. Why aren't you adopting one of them?
We believe that God is calling us to Ethiopia this time. You either get that, or you don't. This question still ticks me off.

Q: Who is your agency?
A: Gladney in Ft. Worth.

Q: How does all this work?
A: We are just beginning the paperchase now, which is extensive and overwhelming. As soon as all that is completed and we turn in what is called a dossier, we will receive a referral - hopefully by this time next year. HAHAHAHAHA A referral is a photograph of our child and information about him or her. After we accept the referral, the child will be taken from an orphanage to a home run by Gladney, where he or she will be loved and fattened up, essentially. Bethie actually was in Gladney care for over a year before her referral. Then there are two court dates. If we pass both of them the first time, we will plan our trip to go get our baby. And finally post photos on the blog!! We are hoping to have a babe-in-arms sometime summer or fall 2011. HAHAHAHAHA

I am on a yahoo adoption board, and lots of families passed court this past week. It is thrilling to see the rejoicing emails. I left all those boards. People on adoption internet boards are typically ca-ra-zy.

Q: Are you getting a girl or a boy?
A: We are getting a girl this time. Hopefully our baby will be less than a year old HA HA Missy you're on a roll! when we get her. And we have already named her Bethlehem.

Q: What if the baby has AIDS?
A: The babies are tested at least twice before they are adopted. The chances are very low. We are requesting a healthy child. There are many special needs children who need to be adopted, but I simply don't have the bandwidth for that right now.  Maybe someday, when our children are older and more independent, that would be an option. As our kids got older, we opened up our special needs list considerably.

Q: Um, can I ask about how much this all costs?
A: Um, about 28,000 buckaroos.

Q: Oh, we could never afford to do that.
A: Most people can't. Most people can't afford a new car either, but when they want or need one, they seem to find the money somehow. {smile} {smile}

Q: Um, so, like, how are you getting that money?
A: Um, so, can we borrow about 28,000 buckaroos? We haven't figured all that out yet. But we know that God loves adoption and believe that He will provide. GOD PROVIDED EVERY STINKING PENNY.

(Please don't think that knowing that doesn't mean I don't have 12 count 'em 12 zits on my chin at the moment, my shoulders are hard as a rock, and my friend Nicole had to hug me today when I burst into tears. God is faithful - Missy is a stressbag.) GOD PROVIDED EVERY STINKING PENNY.

Oh, and, Uncle Sam gives you a $12,000 adoption tax credit. Cool, huh? Also, Walker's company gives an adoption benefit - many companies do. So we will get that back. We just have to come up with the money up front - that is the hard part. Small price to pay for another sugarlump. GOD PROVIDED EVERY STINKING PENNY.

(My fantasy is for our church to provide adoption grants to families as part of the missions budget. Maybe someday.) Still hasn't happened. Hello, new church.

Q: Will you put a little donation thingy on your blog like some people do?
A: Walker is not comfortable with that. But if I can figure out a way for people to donate miles to us for the trip over, I will. Forgot about that, need to research.

Q: So you will actually go to Ethiopia?
A: Yes, for about a week. Twice. I have always wanted to go to Africa so I am psyched. And I definitely want to see the land that is giving us our baby. And no, we don't intend to take our kids. Unless we get LOTS and LOTS of miles donated! We are hoping to take at least two kids now.

Update: Ethiopia has changed the law regarding this: now we must attend the first court date, leave her there (which will kill me), then return about two months later. This added around $5-6K to the cost of the adoption, so the new total is now about $28K.

Q: How do the kids feel about the adoption?
A: Thrilled. Every one of them adores babies. Still thrilled.

Q: How does your extended family feel about the adoption?
A: Some are more encouraging than others. God has changed hearts.

Q: Are you worried about being a white family adopting a black baby?
A: We know it will have its difficulties. We consider them minuscule in comparison to the difficulty of being an orphan in a devastated country like Ethiopia.

Q: Where can I get more information?
A: Oh, I am SO glad you asked. One of the best websites is There Is No Me Without You, by Melissa Fay Greene, who wrote a book of the same name that I have not yet read. It is a wealth of information, and this article says it all.

Orphan Sunday is coming up this Sunday. The website has lots of information.

You can google "Ethiopia adoption blogs" and be kept busy all night. Here is one of my personal faves. Just start clicking on her blogroll.

Gwen Oatsvall is one of my favorite people I have never met. I got to meet her! Twice now. She's hysterical. She is currently adopting from Uganda - her new website with cute shirts is here.

You can also go to YouTube and enter in "Ethiopia adoption" and be kept busy all night. Have your Kleenex close by.

Few of my faves: I got to meet Kristi too. Also hysterical. I think it's a requirement.





Our Journey to Elijah Mihretu - Ethiopia Adoption from Amy @ Filled With Praise on Vimeo.





See what I mean? I see these and I know, we'll find a way. We will find a way. GOD PROVIDED EVERY STINKING PENNY.

If I didn't answer any other questions, please leave me a comment.

And thanks for askin. ;)

40 comments:

  1. oooh! I'm first?

    My friend Melodie just adopted baby Desta from Ethiopia. I can put you in touch. She has been home about two months max. We got to meet her the other day...she is beautiful.

    I was moved my your comments on adoption being the closest earthly thing resembling God's love for us. Beautiful.

    Adoption touches my heart so deeply...sometimes I wonder if I'm called. At this point there is nothing saying YES. An open heart is all God asks...?

    Wonderful post. God bless you on this journey.

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  2. Missy, Your family is in my prayers huge right now. What a tremendous journey you've begun! Adoption is near and dear to my heart, I worked at a baby orphanage in Hong Kong for three months one summer in college and it's totally changed my life. I know God's called us to adopt as well, but now's not the time for us. I have so many blog friends on this journey right now and I'm so excited to follow your journey as well! God bless you guys for being open to all of the unknowns, stepping out in faith and being obedient. Thanks for sharing this part of your life.

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  3. i've been reading for awhile.
    don't think i've ever commented...but i have to now.

    LOVED this post!
    so glad i read it tonight!

    we have 4 biological kids.
    started the process to adopt 2 kids from Rwanda about 2 months ago.

    i love reading all your answers because...well...it was like reading my heart :-)

    thanks for sharing!
    can't wait to follow your journey!

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  4. So exciting for you! I know two people who have adopted from Ethiopia, and their babies are SO adorable. I hope it goes quickly and smoothly!!

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  5. Thanks for the update! Your process is slightly different than mine (China Child of Promise program), but we are in a similar stage in the process as you. Every now and then I stare at the huge pile of paperwork to complete for the dossier and go eat a cookie instead. Looking forward to the day when we all get to see pictures of your beautiful baby!

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  6. Oh Missy how exciting! I will be praying for you and your baby during this process!!!!

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  7. Amen Sister! Thank you for sharing this!

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  8. Thanks so much for that!! I would love to adopt and Ethiopia has been on my mind, even before you brought it up. DH isn't as sure about the process but maybe I'll show him some of those videos... :)

    About the cost... we have friends that just adopted their 3rd child, each about $20,000 and they said, "Anyone will pay that for a new vehicle, but you can't take it to heaven with you..." That is so true, your child is an eternal investment!

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  9. My husband and I are also adopting a baby from Ethiopia...and we are using Gladney! Reading your words here was like reading the words that I have said over and over and over since we began our adoption process. Thank you for getting it all down in one place!

    Best of luck! I'll be following along!

    Becky

    PS I am also friends with the Melodie that your first commenter spoke of. Her little Desta is so cute!

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  10. suggestion for the paperwork IF you can fill it in electronically - put the document on a laptop, and go on a road trip with the hubby. Do the questions out loud.
    That's what Martin and I did. We knocked the entire dossier out in one road trip.

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  11. I work with someone who just adopted their 6th child from Ethiopia. They are an amazing family.

    http://blessingsfromethiopia.blogspot.com/

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  12. Thank you so much for this post. My husband and I are in the middle of getting through home study paperwork now. We will be adopting a 6 year old little boy from the US. People actually have the nerve to ask us why we are not adopting a baby. I tell them exactly what you said "because this is where God is leading us at this time" I love it...and you are right Ethopian babies are so snuggly and cute.

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  13. We adopted from Russia 8 years ago and had 4 bio kids also. It is a journey indeed. The paperwork is doable if you take it one step at a time. But the paperwork is just the first step. Do a lot of reading about what kids who are adopted need and what you need as a parent. (Oh, I'm adopted too so I thought I had the fast track on that.) Pray, pray and educate yourself and have a big support system of friends. Godspeed to you on your journey!

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  14. So I haven't officially announced it on my blog yet, but we started our home study to adopt from Uganda. Watching and praying for you.

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  15. I'm traveling to Ethiopia and Uganda with Visiting Orphans.org on Dec.30-Jan 8. Let me know if you get your referral before then. We will be volunteering at several facilities in Ethiopia. Maybe I'll get to hold your baby:)

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  16. I'm traveling to Ethiopia and Uganda with Visiting Orphans.org on Dec.30-Jan 8. Let me know if you get your referral before then. We will be volunteering at several facilities in Ethiopia. Maybe I'll get to hold your baby:)

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  17. I was weepy without even clicking on the links! God bless your family for opening your hearts this way! I know it makes God happy! I will be praying for you all in this process!

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  18. That was the best virtual Starbucks I've ever had. Great post, Missy. SO authentic. May God give you the desires of your heart. My sister wants to adopt from Ethiopia, too. She's married to a black man, so they can have beautiful caramel colored babies of their own, but it's awesome to see God open hearts to adoption (and they aren't even believers...yet!). JD and I support adoption through Show Hope. Awesome ministry if you don't already know about it. Go God!

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  19. I love this post! Adoption is close to our hearts... we adopted our first child 19 months ago. God proved His faithfulness over and over during the process... providing the finances at just the right time, orchestrating all the details of our travel and the birthmom's situation, etc etc. We are still in awe! :)
    I so hope we will be able to adopt again, next time internationally. We'll see what God has planned!

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  20. I love the time that you have taken to answer some of the inevitable Q's that pop up. And I appreciate your frank and honest answers. I think each of your readers would honestly say that if we could imagine ourselves as orphans who had the choice of spending our days in an institution or as as an adopted son or daughter of yours, we'd choose life with y'all NO QUESTION!

    Our sweet church friends Michael and Jana have just moved to Ethiopia to be in-country facilitators for Gladney, so I am hopeful that you will get to meet them and their precious daughter Ruthie as part of your journey.

    So excited for you and what God is doing in your family!

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  21. Woo hoo! I'm loving your answer to the "why aren't you adopting from the US?" question. :o)

    We sent our dossier to India last week for our 2nd adoption, and 4th child. We've answered all these questions too -- here's another one you should get used to: "Why does it take so long?!"
    -- Nancy

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  22. Wow! We also have been drawn to Ethiopia, but then I suddenly got morning sickness:-) We have placed it on hold for a year, but I feel there is a child waiting for us there...or will be.
    I am expecting our 7th baby and our family thinks we are nuts! Add adoption to the mix and they really think we are nuts! I don't care. Bless you! and I look forward to following your journey.

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  23. The only question I have is: are you going to add another owl to your blog when she comes home?!

    I'm so excited for you! Yay!

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  24. Yes ma'am! Jackie and I have already discussed it :)

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  25. Yes ma'am! Jackie and I have already discussed it :)

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  26. So excited for you! Adoption has been on our hearts as well, but just the beginning thoughts....wondering where the Lord will take those thoughts. I love the idea of a church providing adoption grants as part of their missions budget. That's something I had mentioned before for our church. Who knows. Praying for you and your family as you journey throught this process.

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  27. Thanks for taking the time to share your q and a's about Ethiopia adoption. Love what you had to say, and I'll be praying for y'all on your journey to bringing Bethlehem home. I have a heart for Ethiopia since my brother & his family are moving to Addis Ababa later this summer as missionaries.

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  28. I just love your blog- interesting how I got here....can't even remember now but I always end up on your blog :) We have a son from ET and he is the most amazing blessing EVER. LOVE HIM!!

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  29. Respectfully, you need to educate yourself about child laundering and illegal sourcing of children for IA. Ethiopia is following the well-established pattern of a country that rises rapidly as a major source of adoptable children and then falls quickly as a result of serious systemic illegal sourcing of children.

    Places to start to understand these things:


    My husband's articles on IA corruption and child laundering for IA:

    http://works.bepress.com/david_smolin/

    Brandeis University's Investigative Journalism Project on Corruption in International Adoption:

    http://www.brandeis.edu/investigate/gender/adoption/index.html

    ABC News about Ethiopia (one of many videos about many different countries that tell a more complicated, less comforting story about IA):

    http://www.abc.net.au/foreign/content/2009/s2686908.htm

    My blog (inactive right now, but good to understand how things work in the big picture):

    http://www.fleasbiting.blogspot.com/

    Our own stolen children story that we have lived out and still are living out:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12185524

    More below....

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  30. Please google international adoption corruption and read and educate yourself. Things are NOT what they seem.

    And as for the Biblical imperative to adopt--it doesn't exist, at least as it is being explained currently from texts.

    Think about the fact that almost every time the word "orphan" or "fatherless" is mentioned, it is in a phrase "the widow and the orphan" or "the fatherless and the widow." The mother and her child are a UNIT. The admonition is to help the two as a UNIT, not to come along and sever them so you can get yourself a child. Both Jesus and Elijah help the orphan ( the fatherless) and the widow by bringing the child back to life and RESTORING THE CHILD to HIS MOTHER--the widow. If that widow lived today an adoption agency would come along and because she was poor and couldn't feed herself and her son, convince her to "make an adoption plan" for her son and if she refused, then hang nearby watching until she and her son were starving and so desperate that she'd agree to give him up in exchange for food and aid or to save his life. In terms of Jesus' golden rule, is this the help YOU'D like to receive if you were to become a widow or if your family were to fall on seriously hard economic times? Wouldn't the the compassionate thing be something very different?

    Why do children have to lose their parents, their extended family, their own identity, their country, and their connection with generations and places past, in order to be given aid during hard times? Is that what you'd want for your children--for a Muslim family from Saudi Arabia to come along and be your children's "forever family" ? We think only of what a child gains, not what a child loses. But adoption always involves loss. Adoption always begins with tragedy and inflicts more loss on a child. Ideally it should be a child welfare solution of last resort therefore. Yet money and demand for children make it a solution of first resort in the countries where IA "heats up." And in some cases, it becomes a solution where no solution was needed in the first place; it becomes a solution, rather, to the adoption agencies' needs for children.

    There is nothing particularly laudable or Christian or merciful about unnecessarily severing a child from his family, especially when that family simply needed aid. And some day that child WILL question how she came to be adopted. Most adult adoptees report that this happens in their 20's and 30's and it is not pretty when the answer is that they were needlessly removed from their families and cultures of origin.

    Please look into how these thousands of children for IA are being and have been being sourced for IA in Ethiopia and in country after country (Guatemala, Vietnam, Cambodia, Andhra Pradesh India, etc.--even China most recently), and the role that money and filling a market (and generating that market in the first place) plays into it.

    Respectfully,

    Desiree
    Adoptive parent of 2 stolen children

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  31. Please google international adoption corruption and read and educate yourself. Things are NOT what they seem.

    And as for the Biblical imperative to adopt--it doesn't exist in the way it is currently being explained.

    Think about the fact that almost every time the word "orphan" or "fatherless" is mentioned, it is in a phrase "the widow and the orphan" or "the fatherless and the widow." The mother and her child are a UNIT. The admonition is to help the two as a UNIT, not to come along and sever them so you can get yourself a child. Both Jesus and Elijah help the orphan ( the fatherless) and the widow by bringing the child back to life and RESTORING THE CHILD to HIS MOTHER--the widow. If that widow lived today an adoption agency would come along and because she was poor and couldn't feed herself and her son, convince her to "make an adoption plan" for her son and if she refused, then hang nearby watching until she and her son were starving and so desperate that she'd agree to give him up in exchange for food and aid or to save his life. In terms of Jesus' golden rule, is this the help YOU'D like to receive if you were to become a widow or if your family were to fall on seriously hard economic times? Wouldn't the the compassionate thing be something very different?

    There is nothing particularly laudable or Christian or merciful about unnecessarily severing a child from his family, especially when that family simply needed aid. And some day that child WILL question how she came to be adopted. Most adult adoptees report that this happens in their 20's and 30's and it is disturbing when the answer is that they were needlessly removed from their families and cultures of origin.

    Please look into how these thousands of children for IA are being and have been being sourced for IA in Ethiopia and in country after country (Guatemala, Vietnam, Cambodia, Andhra Pradesh India, etc.--even China most recently), and the role that money and filling a market (and generating that market in the first place) plays into it.

    Respectfully,

    Desiree
    Adoptive parent of 2 stolen children

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  32. Desiree, I am well aware of all the controversy regarding international adoption and it grieves me that you had such a traumatic experience.

    And I completely disagree with your conclusions regarding how to respond.

    My child would grow up in an orphanage with no parents and no one to love her. Should she survive childhood, her choices upon leaving the orphanage will be poverty and certainly temptation to enter the sex trade, where she would probably become pregnant, and the orphan cycle will continue.

    I don't believe that the points that you raise are a good enough reason to leave a child in an orphanage when we have the resources to bring her into a loving home, whether that loving home is in her birth country or not.

    I cannot change the culture of Ethiopia, which while it has many wonderful attributes, I won't pretend that it is not also one that includes corruption, poverty, famine, high infant and maternal mortality, infanticide, AIDS, low life expectancy, slavery, and child prostitution - all magnified considerably for the millions of orphans and street children. For now, I can only remove one orphan from this 'culture', which means I am leaving approximately five million more to fend for themselves.

    So, yeah. We're still going to get her.

    Every adoption agency I know of, and many adoptive parents, are extremely involved in helping the communities from which these children come and where so many remain. More good has come to these communities as a result of the awareness raised by international adoption than ever did before.

    The number of children adopted is a drop in the bucket. It is virtually negligible in light of the entire orphan crisis.

    Adoption is *not* the problem. It is an urgent response to a very large crisis. Ideally, there would be no need for adoption, ever. I do not, however, expect to see that ever be the case in this very fallen and corrupt world.

    Until the need for adoption is eradicated completely, we will open our home to as many homeless children as we are able to.

    PS - I am adopted.

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  33. PS - Desiree, while I disagree with the majority of your ideals and have no desire for the "rights" you are demanding for ME, an adoptee, I must say that I do appreciate the fact that you are fighting hard to eradicate corruption in international adoption. Any AP with a heart and a brain does not want the slightest bit of coercion to take place regarding their child. But the majority of us hear much different stories about how their child came into care than the horrific circumstances of the children you adopted.

    For instance, a friend's daughter came into care because at age 4, her uncle considered her to young to be sold as a sex slave, which is what he had done to her older sister after her parents died of AIDS. This is the more typical story. And the primary reason we went with Gladney was because it had an excellent reputation and is committed to ethics. I'm sorry you could not say the same about the agency you chose.

    Therefore, it seems to me that your call for an end to all IA is throwing the baby out with the bathwater, no pun intended.

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  34. Dear Missy,
    I am a mother of three sons and the wife to a wonderful husband and a daughter of our heavenly father...yet still desire more! It has been placed on my heart to adopt and look forward to meeting my child someday! We have not started the process but have been in prayer as we are trying to make finacial arrangements first and the proceed with paperwork! I wish you the best and will pray for you and your family! The thought of being able to care for one of God's precious children makes my heart sing! I love my boys and would have loved to have more of our own too but things happen out of our control and I dwelled on the negative for a longtime and now I know why we can't have our own its because God had a plan before I was even aware and he has placed this on my heart! Any advice would help feel free to email me good night and God Bless!

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  35. In our state, a couple seeking adoption cannot be pregnant or have a baby younger than one. Do you know if those rules apply to international adoption? It may just vary from state to state, country to country. Thanks!

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  36. Meryl every country is different. If you go to an agency such as Gladney they have a list of requirements for each country.

    Most agencies require that there be one year between the oldest and youngest. Many also don't want you to adopt out of birth order.

    However, the process takes so long, that the only way that this would be a problem is if you got pregnant after you had already completed your paperwork. W

    hat I mean is, you could have a newborn now and start the process. By the time you got your adopted baby home, baby #1 would be close to 2 years old so it wouldn't matter.

    But if I were to get pregnant or adopt another child right now, my adoption would be put on hold by Gladney.

    Does that help?

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  37. I'm so glad you did this update... I have read your blog just randomly for the last year, but had no real idea about your adoption journey.

    My husband and I have talked about adoption since before we were married almost 10 years ago. Now with twin 4 year olds, and a 2 year old... we're about to submit the application, background checks, and initial paperwork to start a domestic adoption. I always thought we'd do a Russian adoption, but having moved to New Mexico a few years ago we have felt called to try the domestic adoption first. We're seeking a boy under age 2, maybe up to age 4.

    I feel the same as you on so many things, it's a comfort. We'll have to think about any special needs since our own children are still so young, but as they age through this process that may change.

    And our kids are eagerly waiting this too. My 2 year old daughter has a baby doll she has dubbed "baby brother," and the extra bed in my 4 year old son's room is known to be their brother's bed (the crib awaits in the garage if it's needed).

    I too have faith that God will provide the funds even through the much needed bathroom remodel (tiles falling off the walls and whole bathroom a disaster) as well as the adoption.

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    Replies
    1. Yea Kara! So many kiddos in foster care. I'm hoping that's in our future too.

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